[
  • Travel Challenges
  • ]

    Koh Tao, Thailand (August 2018)

    On top of Nangyuan Island

    Koh Tao, aka Turtle Island, was my favorite island and my favorite other place visited besides Chiang Mai. This island screams IM SUPER CHILL BRAH AND EVERYTHING WILL BE ALRIGHT. I loved Koh Tao because everything was pretty much walkable in the part where we stayed (Sairee Beach). It was like a beach town but there wasn’t really a beach to hang out at… at least no sand area. Koh Tao is known for scuba diving and snorkeling and there are many areas on the island to do just that.

    Day 1 – Tuesday

    • Check in to Sairee Cottages
    • Lunch at Sairee Cottage Restaurant
    • Walked around the area
    • Dinner at Farango Pizzeria (dude…$90 baht/$3 USD magherita pizzas here for happy hour)

    Day 2 – Wednesday

    • Breakfast at PermPoon Coffee Bar by the Pool (part of our hotel)
    • Hung out at the pool
    • Rained so we hung out at our balcony and read or played games
    • Went to go check out different snorkeling and scuba diving places
    • Dinner at 995 Roasted Duck (BEST FOOD OF THE TRIP)
    • Dessert at Butter I-cream (ice cream at our hotel)

    Day 3 – Thursday

    • Breakfast at PermPoon Coffee Bar by the Pool
    • Oxygen2 Snorkeling Tour (Full Day)
    • Snorkeling at Nangyuan Island, Shark Bay, Mango Island, Lighthouse Bay and Aow Leuk. Lunch, snacks and beverages included.
    • BBQ dinner at Sairee Cottages Restaurant

    Day 4 – Friday

    • Breakfast at PermPoon Coffee Bar by the Pool
    • Scuba Diving Lesson and Open Water Dive at Ban’s Diving Resort
    • Dinner at Roasted Duck (yeah this place was freaking awesome, we went twice)
    • Dessert at Butter I-cream

    Day 5 – Saturday

    • Breakfast at PermPoon Coffee Bar by the Pool
    • Taxi to Mae Haad Pier for Koh Samui
    read more “Koh Tao, Thailand (August 2018)”
    [
  • Travel Challenges
  • ]

    Koh Phangan, Thailand (August 2018)

    First island stop on our honeymoons

    Pronounced “Ko Pahng Yun”, this island is famous for its wild full moon parties or half moon parties (or any parties) at Haad Rin. We just missed the full moon party so we opted to explore the quieter sides of the island. It’s a bigger island, one where you even by motorbike, it may take you an hour to ride somewhere because of the roads. We only planned to stay for 1.5 days but we would’ve like to add on another day to check out more of the island. I’ll include a list of things recommended but we didn’t have time to do.

    Day 1 – Sunday

    • Thai Smiles flight from Chiang Mai to Koh Samui
    • Ferry from Koh Samui to Koh Phangan
    • Taxi to High Life Bungalow & Check In
    • Dinner at Zots Resto @ Tantawan Resort

    Day 2 – Monday

    • Breakfast at Tantawan Resort
    • Motorbike rental at My Hut
    • Mae Haad Beach
    • Haad Khom Beach
    • Lunch at Haad Khom Bungalow Restaurant
    • Pool at High Life Bungalow
    • Dinner at High Life Bungalow

    Day 3 – Tuesday

    • Breakfast at High Life
    • Secret Beach
    • Check out and took their taxi to the pier for Koh Ta
    read more “Koh Phangan, Thailand (August 2018)”
    [
  • Travel Challenges
  • ]

    Chiang Mai, Thailand (August 2018)

    When I first night we touched down in Bangkok, I was super overwhelmed. It’s a crazy city with tight sidewalks, heavy traffic in the streets, and aggressive vehicles. To be honest, even though I’ve lived in NYC all my life, I was uncomfortable. Thankfully, the very next morning, we flew to Chiang Mai because that was the scene I was ultimately looking for. Chiang Mai is a smaller city, north of Bangkok. When I was doing research, Chiang Mai was the most mentioned city besides Bangkok to visit so I knew I had to go. There are tons to do here – from cheap eats and massages to Temple hopping to seeing elephants to street markets to cooking classes. Chiang Mai to me was the chill, adventurous, spiritual sister of Bangkok.

    Day 1 – Wednesday

    • Arrival at Hotel at 1:00pm
    • Walk around area
    • Lunch at Its Good Kitchen (actually pretty good)
    • 1-hour Thai Massage at Lila Thai Massage
    • Wat Phra Singh Waramahavihan
    • Walk down Rachadamnoen Road to Old Gate, window shopped
    • Coffee break at The Coffee Club
    • Dinner at Krua Dabb Lob (it’s ok)

    Day 2 – Thursday

    • Elephant Nature Park all day
    • Dinner at Kanjana Restaurant (very good)

    Day 3 – Friday

    • Thai Akha Cookery School
    • 2 hour massage at Lila Thai Massage
    • Ploen Rudee Night Market
    • Chiang Mai Night Bazaar
    • Walk around night bazaar area
    • Dinner at Ploen Rudee Night Market

    Day 4 – Saturday

    • Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep
    • Lunch at Its Good Kitchen
    • Monk chat at Wat Chedi Luang Varavihara
    • Dinner at Cafe de Thaan Aoan (it’s ok)

    read more “Chiang Mai, Thailand (August 2018)”

    [
  • Travel Challenges
  • ]

    Our Thai Honeymoon with Travel Tips

    Hubs and I honeymooning at the Grand Palace in Bangkok, Thailand

    Swasdi! We just got back a few weeks ago from our honeymoon in the land of smiles, Thailand. We went for about 19 days (the longest we have been out of the country) and it was nothing short of spectacular. We decided to do Thailand for our honeymoon because (1) it’s much more affordable for a long trip, (2) we wanted nice beaches, and (3) we wanted good food. We’ve only heard great things about Thailand from friends and knew it was the place to be.

    We hit up 2 cities and 3 islands which I’ll make separate posts about. Overall, Thailand was beautiful and full of interesting and new things for us to try. I’d highly suggest it as a honeymoon destination for any couple… heck, I’d suggest it for anyone – there were a lot of backpackers and families. We got by just fine with only English and at no time did I feel unsafe (just be smart and aware of your surroundings). Thai people are usually very, very nice people and they don’t scam you. The people that are more likely to scam you are the foreigners living in Thailand. I was pretty anxious and worrisome about going to an Asian country just the two of us for the first time but it really was pretty easy.

    Flights

    We used Hopper to track flights from JFK to Bangkok (seemed to be the cheapest city for us to fly into) and ended up booking Korean Airlines with a layover in South Korea. I think it was around $850 round trip. There are no direct flights form JFK to BKK. Next time you need to do a layover in Asia, please do yourself a favor and do it in South Korea if you can. Incheon Airport in South Korea was the best airport I have ever been to – it looks gorgeous, is really clean and bright and has ton of activities for grumpy waiting passengers. Tons of shopping, food, rest areas with comfy lounge chairs, a “sleeping” area, “digital” gyms which I definitely played in, free showers, different exhibitions to check out, apparently a movie theatre, and more. All of this definitely made my 5 hour layover much better. There are also multiple FREE tours into Seoul depending on how long your layover is.

    Things To Get Before the Trip

    My best friends Mike & Matt backpacked across South East Asia (check out Backpack Bros for their experiences) and loved using their backpacking packs. I took note and put two Ospreys packs on my wedding registry and luckily got both of them. I used the Osprey Packs Fairview 55 Travel Backpack and the hubby used the guy version, Osprey Packs Farpoint 55 Travel Backpack. Somehow I was able to channel whatever minimalism I had and pack for 3 weeks in one backpack. You’re darn right I was super proud of myself! Using these backpacks instead of suitcases made commuting around, hopping around cities/islands, just so much easier. We saw many families (including little kids) use them too. Plus laundry is cheap in Thailand.. we only had to do it once and it was like $6 for 2 pounds of laundry (came back neatly folded too!). Plus those Osprey packs come with detachable day packs, which were used very often.

    Another new thing we got before our honeymoon that has definitely been a game changer for us during our trip is our Chase Sapphire Reserve credit card. There are a ton of websites that talk about the benefits of this card, despite its steep annual fee, so I won’t go into detail. NerdWallet does a great article with a spend calculator to see if it’s worth it (luckily my husband and my spend combined makes it worth it). We have used this card for booking our flights, ferries, and hotels (3x points and included insurance/piece of mind), restaurants and shops in Thailand that take CC (no foreign trans fee), and something that my husband is now loving – access to many airport lounges. Free food, drinks and wifi + quieter and comfier atmosphere to wait = happy Eileen (+ hubby). The Skyteam lounge in Incheon Airport also has massage chairs.

    One old thing we used very frequently was my Charles Schwab debit card (no foreign ATM fees) (I talk about it more here). I was not comfortable carrying so much cash on me at once so this came quite handy, saving me ~$7 of ATM fees per transaction. At the end of the trip, I only had $9 USD in Thai baht left so I didn’t have to lose that much out on converting back to USD.

    In Thailand, my most used apps were Google Maps for directions, TripAdvisor for food and activity searching on the spot, and Grab (in Bangkok & Chiang Mai). Grab is like the Uber of Thailand.

    Hope these tips were helpful! 🙂

    xoxo,
    Eileen

    [
  • Travel Challenges
  • ]

    Munich, Germany (April 2017)

    Hanging at the beautiful Marienplatz

    I enjoyed Munich slightly a little more than Berlin. While Berlin was much more history-rich, Munich was much more of the walkable, beautifully decorated, “loved-getting-lost” kind of city. It reminded me of Prague, where every street was just so lovely to look at. We absolutely did not realize we booked our trip in Munich over Good Friday weekend so we kind of limited ourselves to doing most things on Thursday and not being able to do some things, like go to the top of St. Peter’s Church. But everything worked out and I think we saw everything we wanted to- luckily because a lot of it was just visiting public grounds.

    Wednesday, Day 1

    • Berlin Hauptbahnhof -> Munich Central Station
    • Dinner at Wirtshaus zum Straubinger

    Thursday, Day 2

    • Dachau Concentration Camp
    • Lunch at saray imbiss
    • Nymphenburg Palace
    • Viktualienmarkt
    • Snack at Der verrückte Eismacher und der Froschkönig (Ice Cream)
    • Dinner at Andy’s Krablergarten

    Friday, Day 3 (Good Friday)

    • Breakfast at Weinhaus Schneider
    • Marienplatz
    • Munich Residence
    • St. Peter’s Church
    • Englischer Garten
    • Eisbach Wave
    • Dinner at Schnitzelwirt

    Saturday, Day 4

    • Breakfast at Café Frischhut
    • Train to Frankfurt

    read more “Munich, Germany (April 2017)”

    [
  • Travel Challenges
  • ]

    Berlin, Germany (April 2017)

     

    Fiance (at the time) & me at the Brandenburg Gate

    Hallo! On my day off from grad school and after a failed attempt at making Thai Iced Tea Ice Cream this morning, I’m finally getting around to writing about Germany. We flew from JFK to Frankfurt Airport but the first city we actually went to was Berlin. Berlin is awesome. It’s not “beautiful/scenic” (as it was destroyed during WWII) or a major foodie spot but it’s super filled with so much to see and embrace. Plus, as it was rebuilt, commuting around Berlin was pretty easy walking-wise and with its train system… once we figured out how ticketing worked. More details after the jump.

    Sunday, Day 1

    • Arrived at 9:45AM at Frankfurt Airport
    • Took a train from Frankfurt am Main Flughafen Fernbahnhof (Frankfurt Airport Main Train Station) to Berlin Hauptbahnhof (Berlin Train Station)
    • Dinner at Stadtklause

    Monday, Day 2

    • Train to Flakturm Humboldthain (Flak Tower)
    • Underground Bunker Tour at Berliner Unterwelten e.V.
    • Train to & Lunch at Curry at the Wall
    • Museum Island
    • Berlin Cathedral
    • Berlin TV Tower
    • Bebelplatz (Memorial to the book burning of 1933)
    • Gendarmenmarkt (Square)
    • Checkpoint Charlie
    • Topography of Terror
    • Führerbunker (the location where Hitler’s bunker was (just a parking lot now))
    • Dinner at Mustafa’s Gemüse Kebap

    Tuesday, Day 3

    • Reichstag Building Tour
    • Lunch at Cafe Bondi
    • Berlin Wall Memorial & Visitor Center
    • Train to Eastside Gallery
    • Train to Brandenburger Tor (Brandenburg Gate)
    • Dinner at Mabuhay (Indonesian)

    Wednesday, Day 4

    • Berlin Hauptbahnhof (Train Station) -> München Hauptbahnhof (Munich Central Train Station)

    read more “Berlin, Germany (April 2017)”

    [
  • Experience Challenges
  • ]

    Recap of what happened this past year!

    I’m back! It’s been a more than a year since my last post. A lot has happened since then (all good things!) and unfortunately, I just didn’t really have any time to write. It was my most challenging year yet but I would say it was one of the best.

    So what happened?…

    I got married!
    Planning a wedding took a lot of my free time but it was pretty fun in retrospect, minus the emotional drainage and stress of timelines/$$$ (okay, I’m not selling it but I swear it’s not so bad). Like everyone says, it all works out and it did. It was a perfect day that went way too fast. I’ll share more on this in a separate post.

    I changed my career!
    A lot of people gave me O_O eyes when I told them I was leaving my 6-figure salary corporate consulting job where I got to occasionally travel and have fancy client dinners and almost always work from home… to become a teacher. But I also went from a job that I was not passionate about, absolutely dreaded going to work project managing or writing monotonous reports, working in a cut-throat environment… to a career where I was constantly challenged and never bored, work with people who want to collaborate to help the kids, help students get an equitable education, and get so much love from crazy but adorable kids. Teaching is f**cking hard and exhausting. It’s not a perfect system and there are a lot of moving parts to deal with. I worked harder and much longer hours my first year than I did in all my years as a consultant. But I love my job. (Plus I have summers and week long breaks during the year which is preeeeeettty awesome. But trust me – teachers need it. fo reals.)

    I encourage anyone (who can financially handle it) to explore to find a job that they find a good fit. Many people like consulting and that’s fine. It just wasn’t right for me. I took a few months to explore different jobs before I found one I wanted to try. I could have absolutely hated teaching. But I tried something new.

    For anyone who is interested in becoming a teacher, my advice is to volunteer in a classroom first (teaching if possible) to get a feel for it. It’s an intense path to even get to be in the classroom with handfuls of exams (which also cost monies) and courses you need to take.

    If you are a career changer (non education degrees), look into fast-track programs like teaching fellowships. I considered Teach For America but I did not like that they don’t guarantee you the city you want. I did the NYC Teaching Fellows which was a 7-8 week program. After I passed the program, I was granted certification which allowed me to teach in NYC public schools while I worked on my professional license. Instead of being placed in a school, this program also allowed me to choose the schools I wanted to apply and interview for.

    I’m also happy to chat with anyone who wants to learn more. Feel free to reach out.

    I went back to school
    Through the NYC Teaching Fellows, I was placed in a subsidized masters program. Which meant I took 2 courses at night every semester and am actually taking summer classes right now. I’ll be finished with my masters next year (in total, about a 2 year program).

    I learned a heck of a lot this year but I think one of the most important take-aways from this year was… Do what makes you happy. It’s not easy but it’ll be worth it.

    xoxo,
    Eileen

    [
  • Travel Challenges
  • ]

    He Put A Ring On It & Trip Planning Tips

    Hallo! Exciting things have happened since my last blog post… I got engaged! It is both super exciting and weird at the same time even though 2 months have already past since the proposal. If you’re curious as to my true thoughts on how the proposal went (knowing that I am a surprise ruiner), it went perfectly; even though we have been together for almost 10 years, I was 100% surprised when he asked on a beautiful 65 degree day, on our favorite beach during sunset. Wedding planning games have begun since then, and I’m sure I’ll be writing (or venting haha) about some of those #CHENCHALLENGES in the near future. There already has been a few.

    My fiance (weird calling him that.. okay, my partner? significant other? less weird) and I also took a 8 day trip to the beautiful, history-rich lands of Germany recently, specifically Berlin, Munich, and Rhineland area/Frankfurt. It was an awesome trip filled with many firsts including renting an AirBnB place instead of a hotel, navigating the German rail and local train systems, eating German food, and driving (or in my case, being a passenger) 125mph on the autobahn.

    Why Germany? Honestly, it was just fate… thanks to the flight pricing gods. We used Google Flights‘ Discover Destinations to check out which places would be cheap to fly to during specific dates. We saw that a few European cities were fairly cheap like Zurich, Amsterdam, Frankfurt and used the app Hopper to track flight prices. One day, we saw Frankfurt have $450 direct round trip tickets from JFK and immediately booked it. So, that’s how we chose Germany.

    Of course me being a planner, I planned out my itineraries for the trip beforehand. I used a bunch of different sources for “the best things to do in X city” but mainly from TripAdvisor and friend recommendations. I used Sygic Travel to plot all my points of interest on a map so I could group PoIs close in proximity together, then used TripHobo to plan out my day to day itinerary. I liked that Trip Hobo included suggestions on what’s in the area as well as included commute time (walking, car, train).

    Before my trip, I also wanted to get a no-foreign-transaction-fee card to use abroad. I used to have the Starwood Preferred Guest AMEX (which had this and I miss dearly because it was awesome earning SPG points) but after the first free year, I couldn’t justify the $95 annual fee with my current spending habits – maybe we’ll meet again some day my friend.. Anyway, TLDR – I needed a free card that provided this benefit. There are a few no-annual-fee credit cards out there that include the no-foreign-trans-fee but I ended up going with the Charles Schwab Debit Card. I usually use cash abroad (many smaller shops and restaurants do not accept credit cards) and Schwab will reimburse any ATM fees. It is an online bank, so it is annoying that you can’t deposit cash directly and any money transfers from external bank accounts will take about 4 business days, but the customer service has been great so far, no annual fees, 1.0% interest for your checking account… it’s pretty sweet for an abroad card option. I do have to warn you that they do a hard pull on your credit (meaning their inquiry into your credit score will affect your score). So if you’re looking to get a loan in the near future, might not be a good idea to get it now. I didn’t have any problem using this card in the German ATMs BUT DO call them before your trip to notify them; I didn’t do this and I couldn’t charge anything to the card as they thought it was fraud.. ATM worked though.

    I hope these few tips are helpful in planning your next trip! Stay tuned for more posts on what we did in Germany. Guten tag!

    xoxo,
    Eileen

    [
  • Travel Challenges
  • ]

    Tokyo-ish, Japan (August 2014)

    A street in Shinjuku, Tokyo
    A street in Shinjuku, Tokyo

    Konnichiwa! Hope everyone is well! Happy Lunar New Year to all who is celebrating. I am super excited for all the delish Chinese food my family is cooking up this weekend and spending time with my fam bam…… aaaaaand of course collecting the red envelopes (hong baos). Holidays has been a lil rough on my wallet, ya feel me?

    Anyways, my friend Thanmayi is heading off to Japan next month and that reminded me I needed to dig up my Japan travel guide, as I promised in my Honolulu, Hawaii post. See? I come through…. eventually.

    It was my second time in Japan in 2014 (although my first time was a blur as I was younger) and thankfully I made some kind of guide and remembered mostly where I went. I love love love the Japanese culture. Have always been obsessed with the food. Intrigued in their entertainment and technology – tons of gaming (yo I used to be a DDR master… for a 10 year old), anime (naruto in Japanese obviously… ok with english subtitles), cartoons (sailor moon FTW), makeup, and J-Pop. I even aced my New York State Global History Regents by writing my essay on the Japanese Industrial Revolution. So needless to say, when I found out I was going to Japan the first time.. and even the second time, I was LIT.

    Actually going to Japan and experiencing first hand their culture, their people, the FOOD (!!!) was amazing.. and kawaii. Because literally everything in Japan is kawaii (cute). 24/7. I spent some time in Tokyo but also some limited time with some cities outside(hence my title being Tokyo-ish) but if I could sum up the country in a few words from my experiences, it would be: cleanliness, efficiency, respect, technologically advanced while staying true to their roots. Tokyo is one of my absolute favorite cities to vacation; I would love to go back and explore other cities. Fortunately, we had a family friend who lived in Japan and spoke English, Chinese, and Japanese — I’ll be honest, because we had her around, we didn’t really need to communicate that much but I know others who have gone to Japan without knowing the language and have been able to get around fine. In general, Japanese people are very generous and will help you to the best of their ability. Their customer service in the service industry is top notch in my opinion.

    If you can recall, this was a joint trip with Hawaii in 2014 and I went with my family of 12. We try to get everyone’s input as to what they want to do, thus, it was a packed trip with activities. We only had a little more than 4 full days there and we wanted to do A LOT. More details after the jump.

    Me being kawaii 24/7 in Sanrio Puroland.
    Me being kawaii 24/7 in Sanrio Puroland.

    Tuesday, Day 1

    • Arrived at 2:15PM at Narita International Airport
    • Took a bus shuttle to our hotel, Keio Plaza Hotel (in Shinjuku) and checked in
    • Dinner at Tempura Restaurant near hotel (don’t remember name)
    • Walked around Shinjuku area near our hotel

    Wednesday, Day 2

    • Train to Tsukiji Fish Market (absolutely my favorite part of the trip. best meal of my life here)
      • Ate a sushi breakfast, walked the shops
    • Train to Ginza, shopping at Ginza
      • Bought toys at Hakuhinkan Toy Park
    • Geisha Show at Ginza
    • Train to Asakusa Shrine
    • Sukiyaki Dinner at Yonekyu

    Thursday, Day 3

    • Train/bus/tram to Hakone Mountain (for a view of Mt. Fuji)
      • Eat a black egg!
    • Tram/bus to Hakone Kowakien Yunessun (Water Park with Hot Springs)
      • Curry lunch
      • Hot Springs
      • Got our feet nibbed on by fish
    • Train back to Shinjuku
    • Dinner at Ramen Restaurant near Hotel

    Friday, Day 4

    • Train/bus to Diver City Tokyo Plaza
      • Gundam Front Tokyo
    • Train to Sanrio Puroland (aka Hello Kitty World)
      • Kawaii the f out
      • Hello Kitty lunch buffet

    Saturday, Day 5

    • Train to Nissin Cupnoodle Museum (my 2nd favorite part of the trip)
    • Train to Shinyokohama Ramen Museum (food court of the best ramen)
    • Train back to Shinjuku
    • Shopping in Shinjuku
    • Dinner at Sushi Go Around Restaurant in Shinjuku (don’t remember the name)

    read more “Tokyo-ish, Japan (August 2014)”

    [
  • Chen Eats
  • ]

    #CHENEATSNY Omakase at Takesushi (Queens, NY)

    So. Much. Heaven.
    So. Much. Heaven.

    Woah, 2 posts in one week? What the heck Eileen? Yeah, yeah. For a totally good reason! I wanted to share my latest omakase experience at my favorite sushi restaurant in Queens, Takesushi. If you follow me on Instagram or Snapchat, you’ve probably seen my sushi posts from here. I seriously love coming here for affordable omakase and lunch specials. See my Yelp review here. Omakase means chef-selected courses. You leave it up to the chef and he or she will try to make you happy, usually selecting the freshest or best stuff they have on hand.

    I usually come here for the $65 sushi omakase. It comes with 1 appetizer, 1 miso soup, 12 pieces of nigiri (fish with rice), and 1 roll (usually a free small dessert too!). It’s fresh. Super filling. And affordable (even though I do omakase for special events like birthdays). Swoooon as mouth waters. I’m actually trying out another omakase spot in the city this Friday that I’m super excited for. We made reservations last month, ha. Can Friday come any sooner?

    I brought my parents here for my dad’s birthday recently; my mom likes hot food, and the head chef suggested us to do the omakase kappo (chef selected sushi and kitchen foods) for $80 a person. It wasn’t busy that night, so the head chef and us had great conversation throughout the night. I always try to sit at the sushi bar for omakase, as it just adds to the experience. Eating omakase here before, I’ve always sat at the sushi bar, and the head chef did talk to us, but definitely not as much as this night. Overall, I thought the sushi was awesome, per usual, and the kitchen foods were good, but I’ve had better (specifically, at Nobu 57) — but if you’re looking for that affordable sushi + kitchen food omakase experience, I’d absolutely recommend this place. For me, I’m way crazier about the fish than the kitchen food so I’ll stick to my nigiri omakase. Service, here, is almost always very pleasant. Fun fact I learned that night from the chef – in Japan, a kitchen chef is actually more skilled/valued than a sushi chef.

    Here’s a food diary of what I ate – 12 courses!

    Monk Liver
    Monk Liver

    Horse Mackerel, Toro, and Clam
    Horse Mackerel, Toro, and Clam

    Bonito
    Bonito

    Uni (Sea Urchin), shucked that day
    Uni (Sea Urchin), freshly shucked that day

    Blowfish Tempura
    Blowfish Tempura

    Salmon Skin
    Salmon Skin

    Grilled Scallop with Mayo
    Grilled Scallop with Mayo

    Grilled Spanish Mackerel
    Grilled Spanish Mackerel

    Miso Soup
    Miso Soup

    Otoro, Mackerel, Amberjack Nigiri
    Otoro, Mackerel, Amberjack Nigiri (first half of a 6 piece plate)

    Clam, Jack Fish, Sweet Shrimp Nigiri (other half of plate)
    Clam, Jack Fish, Sweet Shrimp Nigiri (other half of plate)

    takesushi-omakasekappo-10c
    Deep Fried Sweet Shrimp Head

    Toro Roll
    Toro Roll

    Homemade Red Bean Jelly
    Homemade Red Bean Jelly

    Yum yum yum. My favorites included obviously the fish – (fav from this lot was uni, toro, sweet shrimp), but the grilled mackerel was HELLA GOOD. The chef said it was only in season that month, and I could tell as I usually don’t like mackerel as much. Shoot. Is it Friday yet?

    xoxo Eileen